Japanese forms of poetry (Haiku & Haibun)

the sky jasmine-studded
the stars having fallen
to earth

02/07/05 (first published by Lishanu;
also in Lines in the Sand, Bradshaw Poets)

HAIBUN

if the shoe fits (extract)

It isn’t a particularly remarkable day in May. Warm but not over warm. I’ve never been here before, to the Imperial War Museum. It’s much as I expected – tanks and rockets and bits of planes – apart, that is, from the 27,000 clay figures.

colourless clay
around each tiny shape
a bright ribbon

They represent the number of children killed or wounded in the closing months of the Second World War.

young spirits roam
is that the grumble of spring thunder
or something more sinister

published online at:

also in 'freedom passing' available from

dragonfly
drains the rainbow
moon-dusts the path

06/07/05 (first published by Lishanu)

stirred by the wind
leaves and the shadows
of leaves

27/02/06 (first published in Presence)

four years old
she laughs at the concept
of a hover fly

02/05/06 (first published in Blithe Spirit 
then in The Humours of Haiku, 2012)

on the path a ginkgo leaf – but where the tree

(first published by haigaonline)